Be patient, Better days are coming for the marketing of Australian content

Is it time to give up on Australian content?

When I first began this course, I said that I didn’t actually ‘trust’ Australian content and I would more often than not, search for reviews of an Australian film before I even considered watching it. Now, I’ve opened my mind to the development of Australian content, as it is obvious that we have come a long way from our ‘Boom & Bust’ period (Burns, A & Eltham, B 2010) of Crocodile Dundee and low budget ‘ocker sex comedies’ (Middlemost, R 2017). Australia produces not only impeccable actors but incredible writers as well, the production of our content is looking bright, it’s our distribution techniques and reaching the audience that we need to worry about.

Image result for finding nemo

‘Just Keep Swimming!’ (Finding Nemo, 2003). Maybe Australian content producers should listen to Dory?

This session has completely flipped my preconcieved ideas of Australian content, now of which I greet with open arms. Personally, I believe that the minds of domestic viewers would be changed in regards to Australian content if it were more accessible to viewers. It’s no secret that viewers are moving their way onto streaming services such as Netflix and Stan. ‘More and more, Australians are either complementing or replacing their consumption of live broadcast TV with streamed content.’ (Roy Morgan Research, 2013).

Home grown Australian films aren’t distributed onto as many screens as their international counterparts. If you wanted to view The Babadook in 2014, you would have had to find one of the 13 art house screens that were blessed with the psychological thriller. The reality of one of the 13 screens being within a reasonable distance is ridiculous, we as a nation need to have more faith in our home grown content.

As stated by Screen Australia in 2011, ’79 per cent of people agreed (32 per cent strongly) that Australian stories are vital for contributing to our sense of Australian national identity; while 75 per cent agreed (35 per cent strongly) that they would miss the Australian film and television industry if it ceased to exist.’ Granted it has been 7 years since this was written, however I would like to believe its true.

Screen Australia, 2015, Australian audiences are watching online

According to this infograph from Screen Australia, it displays that one of the main ‘traditional methods’ that viewers use to discover new content is ‘word of mouth’. This could be detrimental to Australian production as the preconcieved views of Australian content is isn’t good, which is more than likely what would be discussed.

It isn’t the Australian content that is ‘broken’ per say, its the way in which we distribute and market our content. ‘As producers seek new ways to reach the sought-after youth audience in particular, some have seized upon mobile phones as offering a renewed possibility of delivering product for the ‘on the go’ market.'(de Roeper, J & Luckman, S 2009, pp.8). Taking this into consideration, Australian producers know how to market to their target market and at a reduced cost, they just aren’t giving marketing and distribution the time for it to work efficiently with the audiences.

Overall, we’ll still have the classic first date at the cinema and my family will still gather around the television to watch My Kitchen Rules. It isn’t that we should give up on Australian content, it’s that we need to be patient with the development of distribution and marketing in order for Australian films to reach their full potential, both in the box office and with audiences.


Burns, A and Eltham, B 2010 “Boom and Bust in Australian Screen Policy: 10BA, the Film Finance Corporation and Hollywood’s ‘race to the bottom’”. Media International Australia. August 2010, No. 136, p 103-118.

Screen Australia, 2015, Australian audiences are watching online, Screen Australia, viewed 29th January 2018 <;



Ozploitation & The 10BA Tax rebate

Image result for not quite hollywood

When it comes to Australian film making, a lot of producers need the extra kick in order to get their films made or even propose them. Australian director Bruce Beresford states in interview with The Australian  that he went to Hollywood to propose his films during casting that it was a “nightmare” and that when he tried to cast actors and actresses before they ‘got big’ they wouldn’t give him a second look.

However, the indecisive ‘pickiness’ with casting and scripts wasn’t the case for the aspiring producers and actors from 1970-80. In 1973, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam created the Australia Council, a national funding body for the arts, of which was modelled on English and Canadian institutions (Gardiner-Garden J, 1994, pp. 105). And in 1975, the Australian Film Comission was established. This meant that subsidies from this national screen funding agency began the national policy of direct public subsidies for Australian creative production. Following this national scheme were amendments made in 1978 and then again in 1981 which allowed producers to claim a ‘Producer offset’ subsidy (Screen Australia 2010). Sections of this amendmant were classified as ‘10B’ and ‘10BA’, and these tax subsidies became methods for attracting  film financing for domestic production in Australia (Middlemost R, 2017).

This new form of funding saw the ‘Boom or Bust’ period for the Australian film and television industry (Stratton, 1990). This period for filming saw ‘Boom’ films with great ratings such as ‘Man from Snowy River’ (1982) and ‘Crocodile Dundee’ (1986). Both these films were successful in their own ways and either depicted the Australian lifestyle and values that we maintain. A ‘Super reviewer’ of the website ‘Rotten tomatoes’ called Aj V says he thought Crocodile Dundee’ was ‘A fun cross-cultural comedy/adventure movie… if you like Australian themed movies of the 80s, you’ll like it too.’

These 10BA tax subsidies also saw less successful or ‘Bust’ films, which included ‘The Cars that ate Paris‘ (1974) and The Office Picnic‘ (1972) both of which had poor ratings from websites such as IMDb. Films from this era that were lacking in material and creativity are examples of people wanting to abuse the 10BA tax subsidies which saw a fall in production quality in some of these films made. Becayse of this period of filmaking, is it possible that this is the reason that the Australian audience doesn’t trust Australian produced content?

Director Mark Hartley who is behind the documentary ‘Not Quite Hollywood’ (2008), addresses the period of film in Australia. He uses the term ‘Ozploitation’ which is defined as ‘the exploitation of Australian films and filmmakers taking advantage of the 10BA tax rebate. Typically, genre films such as Horror, Thrillers, corny Romance and Actions films that were made on a low budget with R18+ ratings’. It discusses the abuse of the 10BA tax subsidies which produced low budget films with 3 distinct categories: sex comedies, ocker films, low budget horror films. This period also saw Australia’s fair share of creature features and action films (Middlemost R, 2017).

Since this era of films and television, Australian media has seen a change in what direction the government is taking in the production of Australian media content. As written in the Sydney Morning Herald by journalist Andrew Hornery that “Foreign Minister Julie Bishop to various government agencies crowing about what a coup it is to have such a big, international, all-star movie being made in Australia, with studios lured here by generous tax rebates and incentives offered by both federal and state governments”. Taking this into consideration, Are the Australian government taking its faith out of Australian made content and fuelling it into the beautiful landscape?

To finish this blog post, I leave you with a quote from Mad Max; “They say people don’t believe in heroes anymore. Well damn them! You and me, Max, we’re gonna give them back their heroes!”

Future Australian filmmakers will be our heroes.


Burns A, and Eltham B, 2010, “Boom and Bust in Australian Screen Policy:10BA, the Film Finance Corporation and Hollywood’s ‘race to the bottom’”. Media International Australia. August 2010, No. 136, p. 103-118.

Gardiner-Garden J, 1994, ‘Arts Policy in Australia: A History of Commonwealth Involvement’, Australian Parliamentary Library, Canberra Australia

Not Quite Hollywood, 2008, Documentary, Mark Hartley, Australia

Middlemost R, 2017, ‘Funding and Policy: A History of Market Failure’ PowerPoint slides, BCM330, University of Wollongong, viewed 12 December 2017

Screen Australia, 2010, ‘10BA: The Operation of 10BA’, Screen Australia <>


Why do we have such strong assumptions on Australian media

What are the key assumptions surrounding the production of Australian content?

Being an Australian, we are always compared to the televised streotypes that impinge on our culture and it seems that our culture is the most exaggerated. Movies such as Crocodile Dundee, while a comedy film, has not stopped foreign people asking questions (to myself)  like ‘Do you ride kangaroos to school?’ and statements like ‘Throw a shrimp on the barbie!’


While kangaroos are spotted regularly in many Australian suburbs and country towns, and the majority of Australians do refer to barbeques as ‘barbie’, it’s these stereotypes that have resulted in the Australian audience to somewhat fear Australian content. It’s well known that Australian produced content doesn’t produce as much revenue as the Hollywood blockbusters do, but what’s shocking is that it’s Australian’s who are the least supportive audience of Australian content than other cultures. Screen Australia state that Australian films and Co-Produced films had a 1.9% total in the Australian box office in 2016. (Buena Vista films taking in 26.3% market share in 2016)

According to an article written by Karl Quinn (2014) of the Sydney Morning Heraldhomegrown, Australian films accounted for less than 3% in the domestic box office in 2014. However, with our country producing more rising stars such as Margot Robbie and the Hemsworth brothers, Australian films and becoming more appealing to audiences both domestic and international, with a 2.7% increase in Australian box office and admissions in 2016 according to Screen AustraliaWith this being said, the Australian film industry is renowned for its ‘boom or bust’ mentality. Many Australians’ feel that Australian produced films are far more serious than their American or English counterparts. Australian films are either very serious in the way that they are portraying Australian history such as the film ‘Rabbit Proof Fence’ (2002) or provide light-hearted comedy and strongly influence the stereotypes that Australians’ have grown to dislike, such as the television series ‘Housos’ (2011-2013). Both of these examples were popular in their own way and managed to attract a different audience from the Australian public.

One of the main assumptions is that Australian content just ‘isn’t good’ and it is stated by Mark Ryan (2014) that ‘Australian audience are inclined to watch films in a way that has almost no relationship to the national agenda or the general quest for a national cultural identity in the cinema.’ In relation to this quote, I believe that it is this mindset instilled in the Australian audiences minds that made films such as Peter Pan (2003) which was filmed on the Gold Coast, Queensland and Lion (2016) so successful among the Australian audience. However, not many know that these are Australian produced films.

To conclude this post, I’ll leave with my own thoughts and assumptions on Australian produced media. Personally, I believe that I give foreign films and television more of a chance than I do Australia media content of which after researching, I want to give more of a chance.


Quinn K, 2014, ‘Why wont we watch Australian films?,’ The Sydney Morning Herald, 26th October, viewedDecemer 18th 2017, < ml>

Ryan M, 2014, A Silver Bullet for Australian Cinema? Genre Movies and the Audience Debate, Studies in Australasian Cinema, vol.6, iss. 2, pp.141-157

Screen Australia (2016), Cinema Industry Trends Gross Box Office and Admissions, Screen Australia, viewed December 12th 2017, <;





Opinion on Australian Media content and the 10BA tax rebate

Television was introduced in Australia on the 5th of November 1956, just in time for Australians to watch the Melbourne 1956 Summer Olympics from home. Ever since then, film and television have been the dominant form of media cultural consumption in Australia (Burns & Eltham, 2010). With smart phones creseeping up the ladder the start of 2010, film and television still hold a position in the hearts of Australians’. In the early 2000s, at least 90 per cent of Australian movie ticket sales (Screen Australia, 2010a). However, 90 per cent of these sales were foreign-movie sales. With this knowledge forever begs the question, why do Australians dislike Australian-made content?

Over the past decades, Australian media content is known to experience a ‘boom or bust’ persona of which the content that we have been producing, whether it be a film or television show, is either very successful or is a major flop in the box office. The Australian government has always been supportive of the Australian Screen Industry, and has defended its institutional legitimacy by stating that ‘Australian films have performed relatively well given their release strategies’ (Screen Australia, 2009). The 10BA period for Australian films resulted in one of the well known ‘boom’ times for Australian film and television. This 10BA period started in the late 1970s and ended in the late 1980s. The 10BA era is thanks to the Fraser government amending Australian tax law (the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936) to enable screen producers to claim a tax deduction for eligible film production of which these tax subsidies became a method in attracting film financing for Australian film production. This era was to encourage the production of Australian media for Australian audiences. This boom era produced internationally recognised films such as ‘Crocodile Dundee’ (1986) and ‘Mad Max’ (1979) of which still get quoted and referenced today. However, within this 10BA period, there were many producers and film enthusiasts who used and abused these subsidies for their own gain, not exactly for public entertainment. This is referred to as ‘Ozploitation’ and the term was coined by Australian film maker Mark Hartley in his documentary, Not Quite Hollywood (2008). This documentary reveals that the late 1970’s and early 1980’s witnessed the production of a number of Australian genre films now labelled as Ozploitation films such as the film Patrick (1978). Many audience members would consider that some films produced in the 10BA period were a success and met their budget in the box office whilst others did not. An “improved financial infrastructure for screen production [could’ve lead to a] high risk and low profitability of Australian screen production” (Burns and Eltham, 2010). This encourages the fact that due to the tax subsidies provided for the Australian film industry that many people were deciding to join in and therefore creating low budget and lesser quality films.

If you ask many Australian citizens and ask what their thoughts are on ‘Crocodile Dundee’ or even ‘Gallipoli’, many will either say that it is ‘stereotypical of the Australian culture and does not depict an accurate representation’ or that it is ‘too serious of a film and lacks the comedic relief that many Australians take pride in’ of their culture. However, both these films were one of the biggest successes from Australian production during the 10BA period when it comes to their box office returns. I believe that many Australians in the modern-day era are more welcoming to Australian produced television over Australian produced films. For example, the hit television show ‘Neighbours’ which aired its first episode the 18th of March 1985 has seen continuous success of the last few decades and will more than likely see continuing success in the future.  I believe that ‘Neighbours’ is successful in the same way that the series ‘Kath & Kim’ was successful in that it was a show that many people related to. As stated by ‘the Conversation’ ‘Neighbours’ stories tend to work through issues to regain a state of balance and happiness.’ And ‘A key factor is always telling stories emotionally and within character. I think this is one of the things that makes the show endure: a loyalty to character, plus a sense of hope.’ This statement supports my argument in that ‘Neighbours’ is popular for its relatability to the audience. Furthermore, this statement demonstrates that Australians are more inclined to watch Australian television as opposed to films because the audience is able to connect with the characters over a period of time.

Australian film commission defined Australian content as those productions under Australian creative control. If you are needing to gain funding for a creative project, Screen Australia will grant funding for your piece, it must contain significant Australian content. This is Screen Australia’s way in protecting Australian content. Alex Storer of AWS Productions (2015) states that ‘Australian Cinema needs something else to interweave with these smaller scale productions, we need films that will appeal more broadly and with quality writing, clever marketing, and most importantly – essential storytelling driving by memorable characters.’ Furthermore, I believe that for the Australian content is to reach another ‘boom’ era that Australian producers and writers should stray from hosting extravagant films, unrecognized as Australian due to foreign directors and producers such as ‘Thor’ and use their creative intellect in producing simple Australian films based on the reality that is living in Australia and simply being Australian.

Australian produced media content is far more popular with international viewers as opposed to domestic. Some producers produced creative pieces that is far from the Australian culture which “reflects an American perspective of Australia”, which therefore inhibits the classic ‘Aussie stereotype’ that many foreigners love. This however, marketed Australia to others as a tourist destination instead of accurately reflecting Australia’s culture. It is that of “mateship” and “the freedom of opinion and speech” that Australians provide themselves on. International viewers from countries such as the United States and the U.K. love the satirical and comedic feature film that is “Crocodile Dundee”, however when compared to the Australian culture, it is far from reality which is why I think that many Australians are not a fan of the film. The strong, muscular persona of Australian men that is portrayed in the stereotypical manner in this film is lacking truth of the Australian values as mentioned before. Whilst this film did perform well in the box office dur to the 10BA period’s tax rebate, I do not believe that it accurately reflects Australian culture.

Overall, I believe that the Australian film and television industry has not been successful in the market. It has not been as successful as Hollywood films however I do not believe that these two industry’s should be compared. The 10BA tax rebate didn’t help the Australian film and television industry however I do believe that without the incentive we wouldn’t have seen the successful films like ‘Crocodile Dundee’ and ‘Gallipoli’ reach the cinema. It is because of this that I have faith in the Australian film industry that they can produce quality films, it is however with incentive and drive that they can make it happen.



Burns, A and Eltham, B 2010, “Boom and Bust in Australian Screen Policy: 10BA, The Film Finance Corporation and Hollywood’s ‘Race to the bottom’”, Media International Australia, no. 136, pp. 103 – 115.

Cinema industry trends, Gross box office and Admissions, Screen Australia, March 2016, viewed 12th December 2017 <;

The Conversation, ‘After 30 years, can Neighbours and Australians become good friends?’ The Conversation, 17th March 2015, viewed 10th December 2017 <>

George, S 2017, ‘Local Content: Policy, Pressure Points, Options, Impacts’, Screen Australia, 8th September 2017, viewed 11th December 2017 <;

Hartley M, 2008, “Not quite Hollywood” film.

Storer, A 2015, ‘What’s wrong with the Australian Film Industry?’, AWS Productions, weblog post, 13th April 2015, viewed 11th December 2017 <>



Final update on my research!!!


Trolle K, ‘People walking and biking at Assistens Kirkegården. At Nørrebro, Copenhagen, Denmark’ <; Creative Common Licensing


Last time I wrote about this I was fairly certain I knew exactly what I was writing about. However, It was brought to my attention that I very much got sidetracked on what it was I wanted to know. I started this project asking the question ‘Why are university students not travelling during their time at university as much as we used to?’ Which of course, is the question I want to know.

When I began my research and started searching for primary research, the answers I got deterred me from my question. Student’s began telling me about places that they’ve been to and why they went as opposed to places they want to go to and why they aren’t going yet.

When it comes to researching and myself as a person, I find myself to get distracted from the task at hand. When it came to looking for sources, I struggled. The sources i could find were solely based around why students should travel, where students that are travelling have travelled and how much students are spending. Whereas, I wanted to know whether it was the student HECS debt that is the grey cloud that is hindering students from travelling, because they’re feeling that they cant afford to do it so early in life.

Another thing that I found difficult when conducting this research project was creativity. When I couldn’t find any sources relating to my question, instead of figuring out a new way to find what I wanted, I ended up just accepting that this is what I had and I needed to work with it. Which lead to me completely sidetracking from what I wanted to know.

Another question I have addressed in this research, is whether or not it is our relationships that affect our choices in life. Are we more likely to say no to going out saturday night in order to save money? And if we are invited to breakfast twice a week are we, as millenials prepared to sacrifice avo on toast? (triggered) Why is it that our social life is broadly encapsulated by the notion of going to breakfast/lunch/dinner with our friends as opposed to bringing your own lunch to a park bench or just going to each others house to watch a movie? Maybe then, university students will view travelling during their studies as a more realistic goal.

Thanks for keeping me company during this whirlwind of confusion I call a research project.



For this task, I wanted to focus on a very important aspect of my life that has shaped me to be who I am today; My relationship with my twin sister.

I sought inspiration from a couple of creative pieces such as George Ella Lyon’s poem ‘Where I’m From’ and the music video from Lukas Graham ‘7 years’.

Throughout this clip it’s just recording of a day out with my sister. We ventured out to Burragorang Lookout due to the fact that it’s somewhere we used to go all the time as kids. I contrast the day out with shots of old photos of my sister and I, to then bringing it back to modern day us. ‘Itsy, bitsy spider’ is playing on piano throughout the whole clip as my sister used to sing the nursery rhyme all the time as she was under the impression it would get rid of my fear of spiders.

I hope you enjoy this clip as much as I enjoyed creating it



Taken for Granted – Soundscope

When thinking about where i’m from in terms of sound, I found it incredibly difficult to get off the ground so to speak in what I wanted to do for this assessment. It’s hard to determine what resonates with you in terms of sounds other than noise. It wasn’t until a close family member was admitted to hospital not long ago that I decided what I wanted to do. ‘Taken For Granted’ is a sound piece based on how we can enjoy all of the things life has to offer, but still knowing that it can all go wrong. We’re all from happiness, this piece includes sounds of my dog playing, walking through nature, rainfall and the chitter chatter of friends in a public area. All whilst having the beeping of a hospital machine in the background. I hope everyone enjoys this piece!

For this piece, I drew inspiration from a few sources:

Podcasts – By Design <;

System of Survival – <;

Lars Lentz – <;

Disclaimer (My mum is well, was just a scare :))


Research update – If only travelling was free!



Hi Everyone!

My research project has taken a different turn since I last updated everyone. Before it was, ‘Why aren’t Australian domestic students travelling abroad during their time at univerisity?’ I’m now focusing more on whether it is our financial situation as to why students do not travel domestically or abroad during our studies and whether or not our relationships are also a contributing factor. So basically; ‘Is it our financial positions and relationships stopping students from travelling whilst at University?’. 

Many people do wish to travel overseas during their time at university but many also wish to remain at home and gain life experience which could inlcude saving to buy a home with their partner or starting their career. Which is perfectly fine! I’m a fan of long term plans!

After recieving 80 survey respondants (So far) through the social media platforms facebook and twitter, I found people were more likely to respond when it was something that they were interested in. The majority of my survey respondants were people who have already travelled whilst being at university as opposed to students who have not. BCM212 graph

I also found that when trying to recruit survey responders, people were more likely to respond when I posted in a light-hearted manner. Making sure to make others feel like they weren’t forced to take my survey and that they were more helping out. (Which you certainly were)


BCM212 facebook

Interviewing people is definitely a learnt skill, I found it rather difficult to remain on topic because I would ask questions from their responses or I would relate their response back to my own experience. After relaying the interview in my notes I found that how I had interviewed was to my advantage as the interviewee was more comfortable with how I was relating to their answers of which it allowed them to open up more to me.

That’s where i’m up to at the moment with my research escapade!

Until next time


(if you wish to complete my survey, and are an Australian domestic student, here’s the link! – )





Where I’m From

When constructing this audio-visual poem it was incredibly difficult to truly encapsulate my own definition of ‘where I’m from’. Living in the suburbs only leaves you with so much to record. However, as Wayne Dyer once said; “Change the way you look at things and the things you look at change.” Living in the suburbs is only boring if you allow it to be boring so when constructing my audio-visual poem, I decided to capture the things in my life that I believe make living in the suburbs beautiful. Starting with the early mornings that many people go through in efforts to beat traffic. From the morning coffee, to the warm sun in the early afternoon to then the overcast skies in the late afternoon.



G Lyon, Where I’m from (

Summary/ Mission Statement (Remoscopes)


Research Proposal – To travel or to not? That is the question.



My mother has always said to me; “The world is a dark and beautiful place, one of which you’re too curious to not explore”. I have always been so curious about the history of places, knowing that at some point in history, someone was standing exactly where I am, with problems foreign to my own and living in a complete different society that I am living in today. I have travelled to 3 different countries and will be travelling to 9 new countries in the middle of this year, so I thought; ‘Why not base my project around it?’

After booking this trip I have had many people asking which organs I’m selling in order to pay for it. Being a student it can be difficult trying to figure out how to pay for a trip. We all save our money for something, so why not travel?

Over the summer I worked 2 part-time jobs which ended up tallying up to 55-60 hours a week just so that I could pay for my trip overseas. I’m not suggesting that doing this is ideal for everyone, most of the time I would fall asleep in one uniform, just to wake up the next morning at 4:00am to change into a different one. I may have hated myself each time I finish work at midnight just to start at 6:00am the next morning but I managed to pay off my trip in less than 3 months! So, it’s possible, why aren’t more people doing it?

My proposal is, is what is the future of travel for students? Is it because of the endless pile of HECS and other expenses that students need to account for weekly, the reason behind why young students (18-25) aren’t travelling overseas during their time at university?

According to the graph below from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, indicating the short-term residential departures of both males and females in 2006 compared to 2016. It displays that amongst the 20-24 age group, more females are travelling than males.

travelling male and female


‘In the year ended December 2016, there were 37.7 million crossings of Australia’s international borders’. (ABS 2016) This projection includes people who were returning home from Australia after a short term or long term stay and also includes Australian citizens departing for short and long term stays overseas.

The questions that I want answered are:

  1. Is money the main issue why student’s aren’t travelling overseas?
  2. Are the anxieties and stresses that studying full time provides stopping students from wanting to travel overseas during their time at university?
  3. Are our elders influential on whether or not we travel overseas?
  4. Are societal expectations of ‘all study no play’ effecting students views on travelling?
  5. Are the lack of jobs available and the wage rate for young adults one of the reasons behind student’s not travelling?

I look forward to discovering reasons why student’s are postponing travel and whether they even intend on travelling at all.


Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016, Overseas Arrivals and Departures, Australia, Dec 2016cat. no. 3401.0, ABS Canberra.