Diaspora: To scatter through

Diasporic Media

What?

A ‘diaspora’ is a large group of people with a similar heritage or homeland who have since moved out to places all over the world, this term comes from the Greek term ‘to scatter through’. So, in simple terms, Diaspora is the spread of cultures across to different countries, also integrating with media and film. Diasporic Media is where a film or television show is produced whilst including many different ethnicities and cultures. Fatih Akin is a German film director, but is of Turkish decent. So, this basically involves the creation of a film or show, that involves many different ethnicities (examples include The Water Diviner, The Lone Ranger, In July, etc…) that is then dispersed across many different countries and cultures.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mr7WImqnKBM – Link to ‘In July’ Trailer

The film ‘The Water Diviner’ is considered a diasporic film due to the fact that many of the employees that worked on the film such as the producers who were American and Australian. Actors and Actresses comprising of New Zealand, Soviet Union, Australia and Turkish decent. This film was distributed to Australia and New Zealand whilst also being distributed to the US shortly after. This is an example of diasporic media because of the many different cultures intertwining to create this film.

This is the trailer for the film ‘The Water Diviner’ which displays the diasporic characteristics it possesses. For example, the different ethnicities of the actors and the different locations that this was filmed (Australia & Turkey).

References

Berghahn D 2006, ‘No place like home? Or impossible homecomings for Fatih Akin’, ‘Journal of Contemporary Film’, vol. 4, no. 3, pp  142-155

 

 

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Internationalising education & cultural competence

issheaderStarting at university as a first year can be incredibly nerve racking for an individual. However, if you are starting at a local university it becomes a lot easier to make friends and is a lot easier to find common interests. For an international student it is twice as nerve racking as opposed to a domestic student. Researchers have conducted case studies to see the affects that a student transferring to an international university goes through. These studies also demonstrate how important it is to welcome and help international students with their transition. Marginson (2012) states that “research suggests the pathway to improvement lies in lifting the interactions between international students and local persons, especially students”. As domestic students, we have a role to help international students feel more welcome at university to make their transition easier.

International students are an  important part of Universities income due to the fact that they pay for their degrees up front instead of relying on HECS debt like domestic students.

International students face many struggles with their transition into University. They often struggle with adapting to the accent in Australia than adapting to the English language itself. This especially applies for Asian International Students, who find it difficult to keep up with the fast paced Australian accent.

In this short documentary created by University of Technology students, international students from a number of countries are asked why they chose Australia as their study destination. Many of which state that it is the “multicultural aspect” and the “cultural variety” which is prominent in Australia.

There are many highlights and lowlights to studying internationally, Universities such as the University of Wollongong and University of Sydney offer services  such as student support services. There are programs students can volunteer for, which involve domestic students spending an hour or two a week talking to an international student about how their transition to university is going and if there is anything that you can do to help them.

Links of support services

http://getstarted.uow.edu.au/how-uni-works/services/index.html

http://sydney.edu.au/campus-life/health-wellbeing-success.html

http://www.westernsydney.edu.au/campuses_structure/cas/services_facilities

http://services.unimelb.edu.au/finder

References

Marginson S 2012, “International education as self-formation”, University of Melbourne, viewed 20/8/16